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UNITED STATES

Juul spent USD 3 million on San Francisco vaping ban battle

07 Aug 2019. Juul Labs invested USD 3 million in a campaign in July to reverse the threat of an e-cigarette ban in its hometown, tripling the size of the campaign's funding, Forbes reported.

The money went to the Coalition for Reasonable Vaping Regulation, a Juul-backed organisation formed in May to combat San Francisco's unique legislation that would stop the sale of e-cigarettes, the report said. The coalition reported the latest infusion in a filing to the San Francisco Ethics Commission on Monday, increasing Juul’s total contributions for the year to USD 4.5 million. Nate Allbee, the coalition's communications director, told Forbes that the money will fund a traditional campaign that includes advertisements and canvassing.

“We are strongly supporting these efforts, as part of the growing Coalition for Reasonable Vaping Regulation, to enact strict new regulation and enforcement instead of a ban for all adults that will fuel a black market for vapor products and the increased use of deadly cigarettes,” Juul spokesperson Ted Kwong said in a statement. He added that the ballot measure recognises “adult smokers should have access to alternatives since cigarettes still kill 40,000 Californians every year.”

According to the report, Juul’s money will go to ground-level tactics such as knocking on doors, sending out mailers and running of television commercials. The campaign took out a full-page ad in the San Francisco Chronicle on 4 August. “Cigarettes kill 8 million people a year,” the ad states. “They shouldn't stay on the shelf while e-cigarettes are banned. It's just a gift to cigarette makers. Instead, let's further restrict e-cigarette sales and marketing to youth, and keep the City's existing flavored e-cigarette ban.”